Ombudsman Sues Arroyo, Abalos Over NBN Deal | Inquirer News

The Office of the Ombudsman on Dec. 28 filed a graft case at the Sandiganbayan against former President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo in connection with the scuttled National Broadband Network (NBN) deal with China, Philippine Daily Inquirer sources said. Read the rest here:

Ombudsman sues Arroyo, Abalos over NBN deal | Inquirer News:

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Beyond Prison and Hospital Arrest for Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo

Remember this? Remember how we felt this way after the NBN-ZTE scandal?

Well, I have a gentler but more radical proposal for these people whose greed has gotten the better of them.

Rehabilitation.

After all, most progressives are at their very core, pro-life in the real sense of the word, and against cruel and inhuman punishment and the death penalty. So, too, is the Catholic Church.

Ergo, let’s unite forces on this one (despite our differences over the Reproductive Health bill) and pray for the speedy and just resolution of all the cases filed against ex-President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo.

Let’s pray that the Holy Spirit or the spirits of our anitos—or ancestors—hover inside the (un)august halls of the Supreme Court, helping shine the light on what should have been the nation’s last bulwark of democracy.

Let’s pray that Chief Justice Renato Corona gains the delicadeza to inhibit himself from all Arroyo cases.

AND JUST what do we have in mind for these people who have acted for so long with arrogance and impunity? 

Rehabilitate them.

Yup, rehab not extrajudicial killing, as evil is the resort of the weak, the challenged and the cowardly. 

Here are my suggestions:

1. Prosecute them, without impunity, in an impartial court. 

2. Give them time in a jail. No special treatment for Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo. But no need to give her extra difficult treatment on the other hand. I mean, who believes in an eye for an eye? Just give her what is  the normal treatment in our normal, overcrowded jails.

3. While in jail, give them time to review Philippine history, the Philippine Constitution, the Civil Service Code. For a few weeks, put them under a regimented schedule that includes lots of prayer, study time (topics above), and for leisure, watching movies like this: 

 http://movies.nytimes.com/movie/118279/Bayan-Ko-Kapit-Sa-Patalim/overview

4. Keep these images (and that of other heroes) around their room: 

 

Andrés Bonifacio y de Castro (30 November 1863 – 10 May 1897) was a Filipino nationalist and revolutionary. He was a founder and later Supremo (“supreme leader”) of the Katipunan movement which sought Philippine independence from Spanish colonial rule and began the Philippine Revolution.He is considered a de facto national hero of the Philippines.


Macario Sakay y de León was a Filipino general in the Philippine Revolution against Spain and in the Philippine-American War. He continued resistance against the United States following the official American declaration of the war’s end in 1902 and in the following year became president of the Tagalog Republic.Sakay was conned by the Americans into coming down from the mountains on promise of amnesty for him and his officials—on top of the formation of Philippine Assembly composed of Filipinos to serve as the gate of freedom. He was invited to receptions and banquets, one of which was a colonial trap where Sakay and his principal lieutenants were disarmed and arrested while the party was in progress. He was accused of banditry and hanged.


5. Remember, rehabilitation means:

“To restore to useful life, as through therapy and education or to restore to good condition, operation, or capacity.”

The assumption of rehabilitation is that people are not natively criminal and that it is possible to restore a criminal to a useful life, to a life in which they contribute to themselves and to society. Rather than punishing the harm out of a criminal, rehabilitation would seek, by means of education or therapy, to bring a criminal into a more normal state of mind, or into an attitude which would be helpful to society, rather than be harmful to society.

Because we recognize that these people who act with impunity are simply not in good mental condition, we also suggest psychotherapy? Try accupuncture. Perhaps there is an acupuncture spot that lessens greed? 

6. Part of their rehabilitation should also include:

a. Labor. Oh, no, not hard labor. Just the usual labor that 2/3 of our compatriots are forced to do everyday. Even better , the kind that many Filipino children have to undertake:


 
  

http://www.yidff.jp/97/cat051/97c083-e.html

b. Separation from family. For years, please. In the same manner that thousands of Filipinos are forced by a collapsing economy and a dysfunctional government to separate from their families and go abroad. We also suggest a six-month stint, at least, as a maid in Singapore. Read:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/4165088.stm

c. Six months living in one of Metro Manila’s slums, where 40 percent of Manila denizens now live. I suggest Payatas or Baseco, Tondo, where generations after generations of Filipino families have lived without hope.




Don’t forget the daily fare of Lucky Me, Lucky Me and more Lucky Me!Oh, for rehabilitation to be effective, we have to take away some things:
No more breakfasts here:


No more limousine rides with a whole barangay of policemen with wang-wangs (sirens) blazing.
Instead, more rides here:


You know, Zen and the art of tricycle riding? Oh, and  please, don’t forget the exercise: 

AT THE END OF IT ALL, I am sure those once arrogant, greedy and power hungry will see the light.

So you see, our proposed solution is nothing, NOTHING compared what those in power have done to the best and thebrightest who offered their lives for a better country!

Let me end with a song dedicated to those who need to be rehabilitated from their greed:

My personal revenge will be the right
Of our children in the schools and in the gardens

My personal revenge will be to give you
This song which has flourished without panic

My personal revenge will be to show you
The kindness in the eyes of my people 
Who have always fought relentlessly in battle
And been generous and firm in victory.

My personal revenge will be to tell you good morning
On a street without beggars or homeless
When instead of jailing you I suggest
You shake away the sadness there that blinds you
And when you who have applied your hands in torture
Are unable to look up at what surrounds you
My personal revenge will be to give you
These hands that once you so mistreated
But have failed to take away their tenderness

It was the people who hated you the most
When rage became the language of their song
And underneath the skin of this town today
Its heart has been scarred forevermore

It was the people who hated you the most
When rage became the language of their song
And underneath the skin of this town today
Its heart has been scarred forevermore
And underneath the skin of this town today
Red and black, it’s heart’s been scarred forevermore


Phl Issues Arrest Warrant for Ex-President Arroyo

MANILA, Philippines (AP) — Former Philippine President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo was arrested in her hospital room on electoral fraud charges Friday in a high-profile tug of war set off by her attempts to leave the country ostensibly for medical treatment.

Read the rest of the post here (and rejoice!) and here.

Read the full text of the Warrant of Arrest here.

Dominican envoy met Gloria in Oct. on asylum bid – report

Dominican Ambassador Frank Hans Castellanos Dannenberg, in his visit to Manila last month, reportedly met with former President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo, whom the Justice department claims may be seeking asylum in the Dominican Republic, Philippine news portal Move.PH reported Friday.

Read the rest of the report here:

http://goo.gl/jGTGq

Read the original Move.ph report on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/notes/moveph/updated-confirmed-dominican-republic-diplomat-visited-manila-october/176069952484648

 

Hello World! –Super Hot Filipina Maid from the Nation of Nannies

Hay naku. Instead of griping over how Filipinas are today known as the world’s maids, japayukis and mail-order brides, or how Filipinas lack pride and self-respect, and all that, what about celebrating our traits, for a change?

I’ve been to many parts of this country and one thing I can tell you about the Pinay in any of these parts: she is so funny.

Just look at our politics, at what goes on at the “august halls” of Congress – it’s an eternal carnival, a circus, a carousel—turning ’round and ’round and yet everything really stays the same. (hopefully not). Watch this:

(In 2007, the daughter of then President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo turned the tables on her accuser and claims that whistleblower Joey de Venecia, son of the sacked House Speaker, brain may have been damaged by marijuana use.)

http://www.gmanews.tv/evideo/11904/luli-arroyo-lashes-out-vs-joey-de-venecia

Bwahahahaha. What drug use? Pinoys use SUGAR, not marijuana. Same effect, larger doses needed.

Yeah sugar. It really must be all that sugar: One tablespoon added to the milo energy drink, two heaping spoons full into the cup of coffee. Or sprinkled on top of bread ala maruya, or with coconut to top off sticky sweet rice cakes. Panutsa on taho. Or sugar in your meat: marinated to make sweet ham, tocino. Hell, there’s even sugar in your spaghetti, like nowhere else in the world.

Who needs marijuana when there’s sugar?

That, and the bananas are enough to keep us up, up and about.

So what if we end up cleaning other people’s toilet bowls, or teaching children other than ours so that our incomes could support the 10 other families back home?

Is that something to be ashamed of? Or is that heroic?

Baseco, Tondo slums on a placid night photographed by Geo Olaya

Try living in a place like that, and if you can still laugh – everyday and heartily too – well kudos to you!

And what of all those children being raised by Pinoy nannies? Well, they may learn to speak English with a distinctly Ilonggo accent, but won’t they also imbibe that light, bubbly, ever-hopeful attitude towards life, that resilience in the face of tremendous difficulties–?

Pinay maids should demand for higher pay because of that specific skill set, ha! We take humor for granted, but is really so hard pala to come by. Check out my German friends, who look like this:

Street art photographed by Pie Crew

Yes, we are the funniest people on earth, believe me.

Dig this:

Secondhand bedsheets for sale in an open Philippine market.

And this is even better:

Beleaguered ex-President as RealDoll?

Had enough? Here’s something I got from relatives abroad:

Top 10 Reasons Why There Couldn’t Be a Filipino-American US President

  • 10.  The White House is not big enough for in-laws and extended relatives.
  • 9. There are not enough parking spaces at the White House for 2 Honda Civics, 2 Toyota Land Cruisers, 3 Toyota Corollas, a Mercedes Benz, a BMW , and an MPV (My Pinoy Van).
  • 8. Dignitaries generally are intimidated by eating with their fingers at State dinners.
  • 7. There are too many dining rooms in the White House – where will they put the picture of the Last Supper?
  • 6. The White House walls are not big enough to hold that giant wooden spoon and fork.
  • 5. Secret Service staff won’t respond to “psst… psst” or ‘hoy….hoy. ..hoy…’
  • 4. Secret Service staff will not be comfortable driving the presidential car with a Holy Rosary hanging on the rear view mirror, or the statue of the Santo Nino on the dashboard.
  • 3. No budget allocation to purchase a Karaoke music-machine for every room in the White House.
  • 2. State dinners do not allow “Take Home”

AND THE NUMBER 1 REASON WHY THERE COULDN’T BE A FILIPINO-AMERICAN U.S. PRESIDENT IS…

1. Air Force One does not allow overweight Balikbayan boxes!

The ubiquitous Balikbayan box!

Now here’s the advertisement portion:

“Hello, Garci?” Jokebook

Filipinos like to think that they can laugh at anything, and however much they put themselves down, they believe that their sense of humor is not only a defining national trait but also their saving grace. This book is a collection of contemporary political humor and is made up largely of jokes forwarded from one cellphone to another.
Also included in the collection is a sampling of political humor from websites and blogs. Price: 190 Philippine pesos.

ORDER NOW at:

http://www.pcij.org/blog/2005/11/22/hello-garci-jokebook

Seriously, we are becoming a cradle of noble nannies.

And for those fatally attracted to life’s darker side, read this:

Ghosts of Manila by James Hamilton-Paterson, reclusive genius whose nipa hut I have yet to find.

More about the book:
http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/books/book-review–gouging-out-hells-entrails-ghosts-of-manila–james-hamiltonpaterson-jonathan-cape-pounds-1499-1420229.html

More on the author, really, a Philippine rare bird:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2004/jun/05/featuresreviews.guardianreview8